When Should Your Child Visit the Dentist for the First Time?

Published on by Efren Moses

Parents are often unsure about when to take a child to a dentist. Should you wait until all of his teeth have come in, or perhaps until there is a real problem? The experts say no. The American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommend that a child's first visit should be when the first tooth erupts in the mouth, no later than age one to two.

Child Should See Dentist At Young Age

Although dentists now recommend that kids see a dentist for the first time by their first birthday, twice-yearly dental checkups and proper care at home are the keys to ensuring pearly whites throughout childhood. For toddlers, however, the first dental visit can be a scary proposition. Strange instruments, loud noises, and new faces can upset even the most nonchalant 2-year-old. But with careful preparation (and plenty of prizes), a first trip to the dentist can actually be fun.

Instilling Value Of Good Health At Early Age

A well-mannered child, adolescent, or teen automatically implies a good upbringing – a person raised with the blessing of caring, respectable parents, perhaps a person who is trustworthy. But the benefits of good manners actually go far beyond that. Developing good manners in a child can go a long way toward ensuring a secure future for them. Good manners can make or break an opportunity, whether in their educational and career pursuits or important interpersonal relationships throughout their lives. Manners help formulate a positive outlook in children and adults that is often admired and reciprocated. Follow these tips to put your child on the road to a bright, healthy smile.

  • Stop sucking habits as soon as possible. They lead to potential tooth misalignment.
  • Choose a soft, kid-size brush. Replace the brush every three months.
  • Use no more than a pea-size amount of toothpaste on your child's brush. This offers adequate fluoride and protection from fluorosis, a damaging oral condition caused by over ingestion of fluoride.
  • Help your toddler brush after breakfast and before bed. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that children under 8 brush with parents' help.
  • Avoid starchy and sugary snacks. They stick to teeth and increase the risk of decay.
  • If your child is unable to brush, rinse her mouth with water to wash away food particles and sugar.

Expectation At Child’s First Dental Visit

The first dental visit is usually short and involves very little treatment. This visit gives your child an opportunity to meet the dentist in a non-threatening and friendly way. Some dentists may ask the parent to sit in the dental chair and hold their child during the examination. The parent may also be asked to wait in the reception area during part of the visit so that a relationship can be built between your child and the dentist. Talk to your child about what's going to happen. Practice brushing with your child beforehand, too, so she will be used to having a toothbrush in her mouth. Most are first dentist visits are quick and straightforward by design. The dentist will greet your little one, count your baby’s teeth, and examine his gums. Most pediatric dentists expect a parent to stay in the room while little patients under the age of 1 have their teeth checked. Your baby’s dentist will also want to talk with you about oral hygiene habits, teething and when to schedule your next appointment. Check in advance to find out if the office offers some kind of reward at the end of the visit, such as a sticker or a little toothbrush.

To be informed of the latest articles, subscribe:
Comment on this post